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Tag Archives: Arne Carlson

Gubernatorial transitions are fire drills even under the best of circumstances

Members of Minnesota's next gubernatorial administration could be excused for moving into the west wing of the Capitol under cover of night and locking the door behind them. Besides the small matter of an estimated $5.8 billion budget deficit, there is also the likelihood - if, as expected, Democrat Mark Dayton prevails in a pending recount - that the new governor will face a Legislature controlled by his political opponents. (Both Dayton and Republican nominee Tom Emmer have announced transition team leaders.)

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Dayton meets with former finance commissioners

Former Democratic U.S. Sen. Mark Dayton, who is facing a likely recount in the Minnesota governor's race against GOP nominee Tom Emmer, aligned finance officials of the last four governors on Wednesday to talk about the $6 billion budget deficit and long term fiscal problems in the state.

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Quie backs Demmer in CD 1 race

Former Republican governors Al Quie and Arne Carlson both agree that they want Independence Party candidate Tom Horner in the governor's office next year, but they don't see eye-to-eye on who should sit in Congress represnting southern Minnesota.

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Horner faces hard road – but figures to have big Election Day impact

For the Independence Party's Tom Horner, September was a window of opportunity. He reached 18 percent in one gubernatorial poll, setting off speculation about a repeat third-party ascension to the governor's mansion; he lined up an impressive array of Republican endorsements, including those of former Republican Gov. Arne Carlson and 13 past GOP legislators; and midway through the month he was raising money at the impressive rate of $40,000-plus a day.

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Horner’s campaign has gained momentum, but can he keep it going?

At a Catholic Charities gathering last fall, Tom Horner and Stephen Imholte began chatting about the looming 2010 governor's race. They knew each other casually from years spent working on Republican campaigns and causes. But as they talked, it also became clear that they shared a growing frustration with the increasingly rightward tilt of the GOP in recent years. Both believed that there was an opening in 2010 for a centrist candidate to exploit the polarization of the two dominant political parties and the resulting gridlock at the Capitol.

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