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The Irish have contributed more than beer and corned beef. They've helped form some legal concepts too

Erin Go Bragh!

The Irish have contributed more than beer and corned beef. They've helped form some legal concepts too

About Janie Paulson

Janie Paulson is a licensed attorney in California, Minnesota and the District of Columbia. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Whittier Law School in Costa Mesa, CA. Janie has clerked for Judge J. Thomas Mott of the Minnesota Second Judicial District and interned at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Currently, Janie provides compliance research and analysis to Bank of America and lives in Charlotte, North Carolina. She is a member of the Junior League. Janie can be reached at jcpaulson@gmail.com.

One comment

  1. I’m completing a PhD thesis on sixteenth century English law and how it shaped it colonial policy in Ireland. One of my arguments centres around ancient Irish law and how Tudor and Stuart administrators remained almost wilfully ignorant of its existence but was widely practiced by the descendents of the original Anglo-Normans who came to Ireland in the late twelfth century, including the Desmonds, Fitzgeralds, and Devlins. Contrary to some popular beliefs, the laws were exceedingly complex yet were more aware of other legal traditions, as one can note through the numerous glosses on the texts by various law families, most prominently, the O’Derovans who were lawyers and judges front both Norman and Gaelic families. However, the English systematic destruction of Ireland and its legal system in the seventeenth century made it impossible to understand how the legal system operated.
    DA Binchy, Fegus Kelly and others have been very prominent in interpreting Irish law, but apart from bit translations, there has not been a translation of the whole body of work since the final edition came out in 1901, and which was riddled with numerous errors. No one has tried to commsiion the Irish government to sponsor a new translation, which would be a long and expensive undertaking and, given all the austerity measures, is not likely to happen for the foreseeable future.

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