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Home / JDs Rising / To flat fee, or not to flat fee?
A flat fee is not always the best way to go in a contested divorce...for the client

To flat fee, or not to flat fee?

A flat fee is not always the best way to go in a contested divorce...for the client

About Kellie Bigham

Kellie Bigham is a 2010 graduate from the University of St. Thomas School of Law, where she co-founded the Student Collaborative Law Society and wrote for Tommie Law News. She received her undergraduate degree in Journalism from Minnesota State Mankato. Kellie is currently clerking at a small family law firm in Edina and volunteering at VLN. When she is not searching for a full time job, her hobbies include cooking, running, reading, photography and being outdoors and on the lake.

One comment

  1. When I worked in family law, we split the baby. (Pun intended.) We would offer a flat upfront rate. If case exceeded 10 hours of work, we switched to an hourly billing rate. We were able to very accurately estimate during the initial consultation whether the case would exceed 10 hours based upon the amount of property involved and whether children were involved (and in some cases who the other attorney was). The retainer agreement did not include appellate work.

    I differ in your conclusion that either the attorney or the client will take a monetary loss in a flat fee scenario. A flat fee works really well if you are very focused in your practice and you know your stuff. A flat fee forces you to be efficient.

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