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In the holiday spirit of fright, here are nine sketches of lawyers from past to present, fact and fiction, whose lives “penetrated deeper and deeper into the heart of darkness.”

Spooky tales of notorious lawyers

In the holiday spirit of fright, here are nine sketches of lawyers from past to present, fact and fiction, whose lives “penetrated deeper and deeper into the heart of darkness.”

4 comments

  1. Your article on Spooky Tales of Notorious Lawyers was fun to read until I came to the entry about Marcus Tullius Cicero. His life coincided with the decline and fall of the Roman Republic not the Empire which was 450 years later.

  2. Very enjoyable read, I’ll say. I’d almost forgotten about Paul Bergrin; I’d read about him when it the news broke and thought it staggering how an attorney is off living a secret life akin to a Grand Theft Auto game. And I smiled at the mention of “The Wire’s” Maurice Levy – my favorite show. I recommend that to anyone who’ll listen. A powerful, albeit crooked, attorney like Levy is the only reason some in the Barksdale and Marlow crew got off their stacked charges.

    I hope Garfield’s assassin wasn’t a practicing attorney at the time. I could only imagine the spike re. number of appeals from former clients in prison. Oh, and ending your article w/ Milton’s Satan is no doubt a high note. I’d only gotten halfway through P.L., book 6/slow read, though the idea of this angel convincing other angels in heaven to rebel and war against their divine creator as some sort of oppressor is argument at its most persuasive.

    Interesting how Bruce Reilly is studying and getting into law. If anything I’m glad he’s making the most of his second chance.

    Again, your article made for enjoyable reading (the Empire/Republic common mix-up is forgiven), and congrats on your first article here!

  3. ^ Most people wouldn’t catch that, though most people aren’t history majors. (Her focus off the author bio is both law and literature.) If the common misuse of “Empire” for “Republic” is a watershed offense for fun — an issue bordering on the semantic — I’d say she did pretty darn well. But good catch nonetheless.

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