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Home / JDs Rising / Dear Recent Grad, It’s more complicated than that. Signed, The ABA
The author took her questions to the top, and the ABA is listening, well sort of. It's complicated.

Dear Recent Grad, It’s more complicated than that. Signed, The ABA

The author took her questions to the top, and the ABA is listening, well sort of. It's complicated.

4 comments

  1. Using various data sets and calculations, I have concluded that 60% of our nation’s law schools need to close. (Actually, 75% should close to help relieve the huge lawyer glut.) See:

    http://flustercucked.blogspot.com/2010/08/60-of-our-nations-law-schools-need-to.html

    If the ABA sincerely wanted to address this issue, it could do all sorts of things such as increasing the standards for accreditation, requiring an honest reporting of employment statistics, and warning prospective students against going to law school.

    That the ABA has refused to do any of that is evidence that it is not sincerely concerned about lawyer overproduction, lawyers’ financial well-being, and the quality of lawyers’ lives.

  2. Procedurally, yes, the ABA must accredit all law schools that meet its standards, and it can’t order law schools to close.

    Substantively, it’s hands aren’t so tied behind its back. For example, it can:
    (a) Reduce full-time faculty/student ratios (>1:30)
    (b) Relax full-time faculty requirements, e.g. allowing them to teach at multiple law schools, hold day jobs, &c.
    (c) Eliminate information/library standards

    And of course, it can always warn potential students that juris doctors have low market values and advocate bankruptcy reform.

  3. Heather

    The JD Class of 2009 had 44,000 graduates – competing for 28,901 jobs requiring bar passage, i.e. not all of these jobs are attorney positions. Is that a good indicator that there are too many JDs being pumped out?!

  4. I don’t disagree with the sentiment of this article and feel that it would be beneficial to make accreditation more rigorous, however simply being fewer jobs than graduates is not the full picture. Attorneys are uniquely situated to employ themselves right out of school if they have the fortitude for it. No one expects attorneys to be perfect right out of the gate, just diligent and competent. They call it the practice of law for a reason and I’ve found many attorneys willing to help along the way.

    That being said, the gap between graduates and jobs is staggering to point where it reveals that there is a big cause for concern here.

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